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Nojoqui Falls

3250 Alisal Rd.
Goleta, CA 93117

34.534471, -120.177648

Hike to Waterfall: .7 miles  Level: Easy

Dog-Friendly: Yes    Kid-Friendly: Yes

Trailhead: 34.532563, -120.176536

Level: Easy

Nojoqui, named after the Chumash village, Naxuwi, is a park in Santa Barbara with thick greenery, Spanish moss hanging from the trees and an 80 ft. waterfall.  There is a legend surrounding the falls involving a drought that caused the Chumash people much hardship. The chief asked for the gods to help them and a beautiful woman appeared showing him to this area and flowing waterfall.  Their hardships were then over.

There was a rancho in this area during the Spanish rule that was later used as a stagecoach stop. Rancho Nojoqui was a 13,284-acre Mexican land grant.  After the Mexican-American war, the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo stated that land grants would be honored. As required by the Land Act of 1851, a claim for Rancho Nojoqui was filed with the Public Land Commission in 1852, and the grant was patented to Raimundo Carrillo in 1869.

Personal Experience: This is a short but beautiful adventure, regardless of water flowing from the falls or not.  Santa Barbara is such a truly enjoyable place to visit.

Nojoqui, named after the Chumash village, Naxuwi, is a park in Santa Barbara with thick greenery, Spanish moss hanging from the trees and an 80 ft. waterfall.  There is a legend surrounding the falls involving a drought that caused the Chumash people much hardship. The chief asked for the gods to help them and a beautiful woman appeared showing him to this area and flowing waterfall.  Their hardships were then over.

There was a rancho in this area during the Spanish rule that was later used as a stagecoach stop. Rancho Nojoqui was a 13,284-acre Mexican land grant.  After the Mexican-American war, the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo stated that land grants would be honored. As required by the Land Act of 1851, a claim for Rancho Nojoqui was filed with the Public Land Commission in 1852, and the grant was patented to Raimundo Carrillo in 1869.

Personal Experience: This is a short but beautiful adventure, regardless of water flowing from the falls or not.  Santa Barbara is such a truly enjoyable place to visit.

The waterfall was at a trickle when we visited.  We got very little rainfall this winter unfortunately.  It was still beautiful nontheless:

Old ruins?

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